Tuesday, March 5, 2013

All the World's a Dive Bar!

That's a bit dramatic, isn't it?

It's true, though. As I sit here at the small bar of my local pub, I think, "We are all just patrons in the bar of life."

I'm just "waxing philosophic" here. I don't really mean it. For real. I'm just sitting here waiting for my meatball sub and salad. I like this bar. It's nice, quiet, has good food. And I can sit here and write whenever and whatever I want. 

I do believe, however, that all the world's a stage and we are all just players. We all have our roles and such. My role is to write on the side while I pursue a job which will allow me to eat and live. Trust me, if I could live off my writing, I'd live in a studio apartment in the middle of Alaska. 

Ooh... That sounds enticing.

Anyway, I have been writing since I was very young. I'm talking nine years old. Kind of like Ayn Rand. I just one day "decided" that I was going to write. I started with a tiny story about a T-Rex who had no friends when I was in first grade. Drew the pictures myself and everything. Of course, from there it just took off. I was writing and reading all the time. 

When I started seriously pursuing it about five years ago, I realized I learned the ins and outs pretty quickly. Almost everything came second nature to me. So, when I sat down and started writing The Death of Me, I never realized it'd become my baby. 

After two years, eight revisions, 200+ queries, and one self-publishing platform, the book is finally out. I even designed my own cover! 

I published on CreateSpace just two weeks ago, and two promos later, the book has been downloaded over 1,000 times. I seem to be keeping steady at selling about one book a day via Kindle. I'm not doing a lot of promotion, however. But I'm sure if I got into it, I'd get my name out there pretty quickly!

So, that being said, what's your role on this stage we call life?

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Today is THE Day!

Good news, everyone! Today is the day The Death of Me hits the virtual shelves!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EEJLK9I/ref=s9_simh_gw_p351_d0_i1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=0ZSD9ZF1R8H1MVD9ERM5&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1688200382&pf_rd_i=507846


The book is currently in paperback, awaiting approval for Kindle!


Once I receive my paper copies, I will be sending them in to Barnes & Noble to see if I can get something on their shelves!


Wish me luck!

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Breaking News: A Leopard CAN Change its Spots!

Nah, I'm just kidding. Leopards' spots are on their skin, not their fur. So if you shave a leopard (which I don't recommend), it still has its spots. Can't change 'em.

But that saying usually applies to...what? People? Yes, but what aspect of people? Personality? Habits? Hobbies? Interests? Career?

I think it's all of the above, really. I'm sure you've heard the age-old question about criminals. Were they born that way or was it the environment they grew up in which shaped them into something heinous? Did the chicken come before the egg? Oh, wait...that's a different can of worms.

I guess you can say that's it a little of both. Some people are born with disabilities which later shape them into who they will eventually become. But others have less than satisfactory home lives which causes some disabilities. 

It works the same with artists. 

There are people who were born to be writers, painters, sculptors, musicians, etc. Then there are people who, with some practice, become great. I think I fall somewhere in the middle. In school, I was always either buried in a book, had a pencil or marker in my hand, or entertained my friends with some sort of show. I've dabbled in drawing, singing, acting, and even dancing. All of those, however, required practice. I took art classes, singing lessons for six years, acting classes, and one dancing class. I wasn't born great at any of those. Now, I'm writing. And although I always had a good grasp of English and grammar, it's still taking practice to be a good writer. 

I still have an editor and I still need pointers from fellow writers. And I still get rejections. Yes, a year after I submit a query, I still get rejections. Although I still want to be traditionally published, it hurts a lot less these days. I believe the advent of self-publishing has made it easier for me to accept that I won't always get what I want, but if I keep pushing, I may be able to change my spots just enough to suit me.

That being said, I'm just waiting on one more partial request from an agent before I self-publish The Death of Me. It's been a grueling twelve months and I'm ready to push it--no matter what. 


This is the cover I designed.

I guess the point of it all is not that I want to be seen, but that I want to share. We all have something we'd like to say to the world, and it's only a matter of getting noticed, right? Artists don't usually paint or draw or sing something for themselves. Do you think Michelangelo painted an entire ceiling in a church just so he was the only one who could admire it? What about Robert Frost? Did he write all that poetry for himself? Poe? Johnny Cash? Anybody? 

All you have to do is rearrange some aspects (spots) and figure out what works best for you. It might be hard, it might take a while, but in the end, it'll be well worth it.